Exciting Video! Maui Salt and Sage Mag

Maui Salt and Sage Magazine, the Maui AMPFest and our website are part of The Aloha Project: Promoting Aloha, Music, Hawaiian Culture & sustainable living through international collaboration.

All three strive to showcase the diversity of the subcultures on Maui with Hawaiian Culture and music as the centerpiece. We hope to perpetuate the Spirit of Aloha and create a worldwide bond between socially and politically conscious people, musicians, artists and writers from around the world.

Mahalos for stopping by!

 

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Coming Home to Maui

screen-shot-2017-01-30-at-12-59-00-pmComing Home to Maui:

Talking Story with Philip Scott Wikel

“On a white sandy beach in Hawaii”

– Braddah IZ

We’re coming home to Maui; I you, he, she, they and us.

Most importantly the Born and Raised are coming home to a new vision of Maui. A new vision much like the one held by the Kanaka Maoli ancestors; an independent Maui only interdependent with the greater Hawai’i Nei.

This would be a new/old Maui that grows, hunts, fishes and herds and ultimately feeds its own; a sustainable Maui. This Maui won’t need barges from the US, diesel fuel for electricity or a cultural identity defined by a foreign culture.

These people have reawakened (or perhaps have just been silenced) to following Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka ‘Aina I Ka Pono. Remember: The missionaries once outlawed the hula surfing and the Hawaiian language. Successive generations of foreigners have sought to outlaw being Hawaiian at all. They also bought up land faster than the Kanakas could say “this isn’t right.”

The Kanaka Maoli and the Born and Raised are not an exclusive group. They seek to be inclusive. All who love Maui and the “Aina, those who wish to steward and nurture her, heal her and bring her home as we all learn to share her.

Many are returning to Maui from far away. One time tourists who had a love at first sight, travelers of the world who found “none bettah,” water folks, fisherman, farmers, and so on. Those who still believe it is their kuleana to contribute to Maui’s well-being in a myriad of ways: Spreading Aloha, nurturing the soil, cleaning up the ocean, cultivating community and envisioning Maui as a beautiful microcosm and model of sustainability for the world.

Within these folks are those who’ve chosen to turn their backs on the US and the nine to five grind; the feeling that their lives had become “just doing time.” They spend their days on the beaches keeping them clean while scratching out a subsistence living. These are happy people free of social and societal limitations and restrictions. They’re quick to throw a shaka, share a meal, talk story or offer kind words that deepen the meaning of Aloha with every word and actions.

Kanakas, tourists, travelers, shore casters and farmers. The tourists who get it, travelers who’ve felt no choice but to come back to Maui No Ka Oi, shore casters who’ve fed us for millenia; whose meditative and essential work inspires a closeness to the ocean and reminds us to relax, take the time to do it right, and smile knowing your home is one of the very best. Farmers new and old will now work toward healing Maui of the cancer of sugar cane, replant with things we need, and take the long view toward the Seventh Generation.

All and all this can be seen as a divine collaboration, the composition of a new symphony, a song that will be easily sung without effort as we tread lightly into the future.

A Hui Ho!

Puka Hunting

Puka Hunting

by Philip Scott August

 screen-shot-2017-01-13-at-10-44-03-am

We comb the beach for pukas

we are fishers of shells

bound by love’s umbilical

as we sift, scratch, and dig for treasure

I go to one end

and she the other

meeting in the middle

we find ourselves children again

and blend as friends and lovers

we make a competition of it

and I declare the lead

yet very quickly the duel is lost

to awe, and the exaltation of discovery

she, me, we, sand, sun and surf

the light of the eternal tryst

a fusion in time unbridled

To protect and serve the Hawaiian Culture, the Aina, and our belovéd Kai…

https://groundwaterguy.files.wordpress.com
https://groundwaterguy.files.wordpress.com

Aloha, my name is Peggy, or, in Hawaiian, Mo’mi, which means Pearl. I’m the associate editor for Mauisalt. My job, aside from proofing stories, is to attempt to bring the understanding of how everything we do on the island effects the beautiful sea that surrounds it.

We at Mauisalt are always looking for fellow island inhabiters who are doing great things to protect and serve the Hawaiian Culture, the Aina, and our belovéd Kai. If you feel moved to be a part of our optimistic goal, please contact us at: Lord.Greystoke77@gmail.com or princesswhitestone@gmail.com.

We look forward to serving you, the island, and the surrounding ocean, in any way we can.

Peace, Blessings and Mahalos,

Peggy “Mo’mi” Johnson, 808-281-6020